Friday, December 13, 2013

Don't Eat The Fish

this from NPR, but if you google Plastic Ocean there is a lot of scary stories out there

We've long known that the fish we eat are exposed to toxic chemicals in the rivers, bays and oceans they inhabit. The substance that's gotten the most attention — because it has shown up at disturbingly high levels in some fish — is mercury.
But mercury is just one of a slew of synthetic and organic pollutants that fish can ingest and absorb into their tissue. Sometimes it's because we're dumping chemicals right into the ocean. But as a study published recently in Nature, Scientific Reports helps illuminate, sometimes fish get chemicals from the plastic debris they ingest.
"The ocean is basically a toilet bowl for all of our chemical pollutants and waste in general," saysChelsea Rochman, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Davis, who authored the study. "Eventually, we start to see those contaminants high up in the food chain, in seafood and wildlife."
For many years, scientists have known that chemicals will move up the food chain as predators absorb the chemicals consumed by their prey. That's why the biggest, fattiest fish, like tuna and swordfish, tend to have the highest levels of mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other dioxins. (And that's concerning, given that canned tuna was the second most popular fish consumed in the U.S. in 2012, according to the National Fisheries Institute.)
What scientists didn't know was exactly what role plastics played in transferring these chemicals into the food chain. To find out, Rochman and her co-authors fed medaka, a fish species often used in experiments, three different diets.
One group of medaka got regular fish food, one group got a diet that was 10 percent "clean" plastic (with no pollutants) and a third group got a diet with 10 percent plastic that had been soaking in the San Diego Bay for several months. When they tested the fish two months later, they found that the ones on the marine plastic diet had much higher levels of persistent organic pollutants.
"Plastics — when they end up in the ocean — are a sponge for chemicals already out there," says Rochman. "We found that when the plastic interacts with the juices in the [fish's] stomach, the chemicals come off of plastic and are transferred into the bloodstream or tissue." The fish on the marine plastic diet were also more likely to have tumors and liver problems.
While it's impossible to know whether any given fish you buy at the seafood counter has consumed this much plastic, Rochman's findings do have implications for human health, she notes. "A lot of people are eating seafood all the time, and fish are eating plastic all the time, so I think that's a problem."
And there's a lot of plastic out there in the open ocean. As Edward Humes, author of Garbology,told Fresh Air's Terry Gross in 2012, the weight of plastic finding its way into the sea each year is estimated to be equivalent to the weight of 40 aircraft carriers.
Consider the five massive gyres of trash particles swirling around in the Indian, Atlantic and Pacific oceans alone. Those gyres, Hume told Gross, contain "plastic that has been weathered and broken down by the elements into these little bits, and it's getting into the food chain."
One of those gyres is the infamous Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Fish could encounter the plastic in those gyres, but also much closer to shore, says Rochman.
Even so, the consensus in the public health community still seems to be that the benefits of eating fish — because of their omega-3 fatty acids, among other assets — exceed the potential risks. And many researchers advocating for Americans to increase their fish consumption argue that the levels of dioxins, PCBs and other toxic chemicals in fish are generally too low to be of concern.
The Environmental Protection Agency does put out advisories to warn consumers when fish get contaminated with chemicals in local U.S. waters. But a lot of our seafood now comes from foreign waters, which the EPA does not monitor. Just a tiny fraction of imported fish get tested for contaminants.
As for Rochman, she says her research in marine toxicology has persuaded her to eat seafood no more than twice per week. And she now avoids swordfish altogether.

Saturday, December 7, 2013

The Pope is a Communist

Or says the Tea Party ideologist

Democracy Lab

The Heretical Pope Francis vs. Rush Limbaugh

When a radical pope says it's time we stopped treating capitalism like it's a religion, American conservatives get preachy.

Wow. This pope really is good at getting people riled up. A few days ago, the leader of the Roman Catholic Church issued a 224-page document (an "apostolic exhortation," to be precise) that laid out some of his thoughts on how the church should conduct itself in the modern world. It's a thoroughly religious document. But a few of his observations have touched off gales of indignation.
Most of the aggravation has to do with the pope's criticism of what he calls "the new idolatry of money." In his text he assails the problem of inequality, asks that we pay greater attention to the needs of the poor, and attacks the idea that the urge to accumulate wealth is an end unto itself. Sure, the bible has a lot of harsh things to say about the wanton rich: "Come now, you rich, weep and howl for your miseries which are coming upon you. Your riches have rotten and your garments have become moth-eaten.... You have lived luxuriously on the earth and led a life of wanton pleasure; you have fattened your hearts in a day of slaughter." And so on.
But Francis is going straight after Milton Friedman: Few of his remarks have attracted greater attention, for example, than the one where he criticized the notion that "trickle-down theories which assume that economic growth, encouraged by a free market, will inevitably succeed in bringing about greater justice and inclusiveness in the world."
Nowhere in the document does he mention specific policies to counter these problems. He doesn't call for increased taxation of the rich. (The word "tax" occurs only once in the document, in a passage that criticizes tax evasion and corruption.) He doesn't sing the praises of collectivism. He doesn't attack the principle of private property, nor does he advocate public ownership of the means of production.
It's worth noting that this pope has a long track record of opposing liberation theologists in his homeland of Argentina. Still, I guess it's theoretically possible that the pope really is a closet Maoist. After all, he does say (in one of my favorite passages): "I prefer a Church which is bruised, hurting, and dirty because it has been out on the streets, rather than a Church which is unhealthy from being confined and clinging to its own security."
That's pretty subversive stuff. But the point here is that he doesn't actually offer up specific policy proposals to cure the problems he's describing. That's because he's analyzing a spiritual crisis. He's not outlining programs. He's describing a malaise that he sees in the world and challenging us to fix it.
But who cares? Why would anyone actually trouble to read what the guy is saying? It turns out that it's much more satisfying to scold the pope for wading into such controversial waters. It turns out there are plenty of red-blooded (mostly American) men out there who are keen to defend capitalism's honor against even the slightest of slights.
Take, for example, Louis Woodhill, a commentator for Forbes magazine. Woodhill works himself into a tremendous lather over the pope's musings. Francis, he writes, "has lent the prestige of the Catholic Church to leftist/socialist whining about the 'new tyranny' of 'inequality,' 'exclusion,' and 'marginalization.'" Woodhill is appalled. How dare the pope claim that such things exist! If there are poor people in the world, it's their own damned fault.
Or perhaps the Vatican itself is to blame. After all, Woodhill explains, the world suffered from low economic growth during the 1,500 years or so when the church played a major political role in the life of Europe. Luckily, though, the Reformation came along, and self-starting Protestant culture liberated us from the scourge of Jesuitical socialism. Given this record of poor economic management by the church, Woodhill contends, the pope should hold his tongue.
The conservative commentator Rush Limbaugh, America's premier political entertainer, was keen to pile on (though not quite so ingenious in his arguments). He was especially upset by this part of the pope's critique: "The culture of prosperity deadens us. We are thrilled if the market offers us something new to purchase. In the meantime, all those lives stunted for lack of opportunity seem a mere spectacle. They fail to move us."
This sounds pretty keenly observed to me. But Limbaugh just couldn't bear it: "That's going way beyond matters that are ethical," he spluttered. "This is almost a statement about who should control financial markets. He says that the global economy needs government control."
- See more at:

Monday, December 2, 2013

Global warming and the big Sky

sad we have to have a foreign news organization bring this to light


Montana: Big Sky country at an environmental crossroads

December 2, 2013 5:15AM ET
Montana'€™s 'emerging, sprawling fossil fuel resistance'€ unites Native Americans, cowboys and activists
Indigenous Peoples
Land near the property of Don and Irene Moffett in Glendive, Mont., where the Keystone pipeline will pass. The couple worries that Keystone will degrade the land.
Nate Schweber
GLENDIVE, Mont. — In the kitchen of a small white farmhouse down a corrugated dirt road, through a sea of grass, Irene Moffett pointed at chalky buttes on the blue horizon. For generations, her family has worked this land. Now, one mile from her property, a Canadian company hopes to lay the Keystone XL pipeline, which would siphon crude oil from Canada's tar-sand mines to a seaport on the Gulf of Mexico. 
"Most jobs won't last after the pipeline's built, and what happens if there's a spill?" said Moffett, 77. "Why should we put up with the pollution, the disruption of agricultural lands? What's in it for Montana?"
Across this massive state, with scenery ranging from snowy mountains to virgin prairies, a diverse collection of Montanans, in love with their land, is opposing new transportation infrastructure for coal and oil.
Three proposed projects — the Keystone XL pipeline, a new coal railroad and a trucking route for mining equipment the size of apartment buildings — have triggered protests in different regions of the state, and not just from people who dislike fossil fuels.
Ranchers, Native Americans, farmers and environmentalists say they don't want the industrialization of the land that comes with moving the fuels and with the equipment needed for their extraction.
"A certain amount of that has to happen," said Moffett's husband, Donald Moffett, 84, standing on tawny fields his grandparents homesteaded in 1909. "But I'd just as soon it stay agriculture."
Irene Moffett in her kitchen.
Nate Schweber
The fuels these proposed projects would transport are among the filthiest on earth, some scientists warn. Environmentalists argue that burning coal and Canadian tar sands oil could saturate the atmosphere with a critical amount of carbon dioxide — so much that the climate would heat up even faster than it is already warming. Many are calling the northwestern United States, with Montana at its heart, a carbon choke point — that is, a place where opponents might stop dirty fossil fuels before they can be burned.
Montana is "potentially a real cork in the carbon bottle," said author and activist Bill McKibben. "And it's a perfect illustration of the emerging, sprawling fossil-fuel resistance. It's necessarily centered in local concerns."


The most controversial of the pending projects is the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, a project yet to be approved by President Barack Obama's administration. Around the world, many have debated the project in terms of risk to the climate, potential to make the United States more energy independent and opportunity to create wealth. But more is at stake in Montana. 
Bill Whitehead, who serves on the water commission for the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, said his mind changed on Keystone in 2011. That year, a leaking Exxon pipeline in southeastern Montana dumped more than 60,000 gallons of crude oil into an 85-mile stretch of the Yellowstone River. Then he learned about a pipeline from Alberta's tar sands that ruptured in Michigan in 2010. About a million gallons of a heavy crude oil called bitumen poured into the Kalamazoo River, where it sank to the bottom, complicating the cleanup. The same kind of crude is set to flow through Keystone, across the Missouri River, just upstream from the reservation.
"Initially you think about the jobs," said Whitehead, a tribal elder who lives in Wolf Point. "And then you think about the bigger picture." He wrote to both of Obama's secretaries of state, Hillary Clinton and John Kerry, urging them to oppose Keystone.
Pipeline proponents, though, note that extraction is already the third-largest industry in the state, behind tourism and agribusiness. Even without the 283 miles of Keystone set to slice across the eastern part of the state, they say, Montana has 6,700 miles of pipelines.
Proponents also say that the state could use the more than $60 million in annual tax revenue the pipeline would supposedly generate. Farmers and ranchers struggling to afford their land would benefit from direct payments for pipeline easements. Richard Dunbar, commissioner in Phillips County, Mont., where Keystone is poised to enter the U.S., said the pipeline could actually help agriculture. A small amount of oil may seep, he said, and put nutrients in the soil.
The Missouri River near the Fort Peck Indian Reservation
Nate Schweber
"You won't even be able to tell where the pipeline is, except the grass will be taller," said Dunbar, 63, who is also the president of the Montana Association of Oil, Gas & Coal Counties. "That thing's going to be the safest pipeline that's ever been built."
But others remain skeptical. Dena Hoff, who ranches in Glendive, just downstream from the green fields of hay that Keystone would tunnel under before crossing the Yellowstone River, isn't convinced the pipeline wouldn't eventually spill.
"I'm worried about my water," she said. "What about my rights?"
Spill worries have turned more acute as Montanans in Keystone's path look to the nearby booming natural gas drilling fields that span the border with North Dakota. Here, in a sweep of prairie called the Bakken oil fields that has allowed Montana and North Dakota to boast some of the lowest unemployment in the nation, many spills have just come to light. In October a North Dakota wheat farmer tending his field found a pipe that had burst and slathered his land with 865,000 gallons of oil, enough to cover seven football fields. Then an AP investigation revealed that in the last two years, there were 300 other spills in North Dakota, mostly small, none reported.
"Why should we put up with oil spills?" said Sierra Dawn Stoneberg Holt, 41, who ranches cattle on her family land, a panorama of dusky prairie in Valley County, just south of Keystone's route.
Sue Frary, 58, who lives in Malta, the seat of neighboring Phillips County, was even more blunt.
"One year of jobs for a lifetime of risk?" she said. "Bite me."
Montana's constitution guarantees all residents "a clean and healthful environment." Written in 1972, it was a response to the scorched-earth legacy left by early-20th-century industrialists. Copper barons made fortunes and then left to future generations hundreds of square miles of land spoiled by arsenic and a mile-long toxic pit in a residential area in the town of Butte.
Since TransCanada, the company that owns Keystone, is based in Edmonton, Alberta, most of the money from the pipeline would flow out of state, argue opponents. In fact, it would flow out of the country altogether. Meanwhile, Montana would assume the risks of spills, fires, industrial decay and diminished property values. Some say it makes the state just an energy colony of Canada, or, as Kyla Maki, energy director at the Montana Environmental Information Center, put it, "a conveyor belt."
Laurel spill
Cleanup crews work to collect oil from alongside the Yellowstone River in Laurel, Mont., in 2011. A nearby ExxonMobil pipeline ruptured and spilled an estimated 1,000 barrels of crude into the Yellowstone.
Jim Urquhart/AP
According to TransCanada, all 539 Montanans who own land set to be crossed by the pipeline agreed to easements and signed confidentiality agreements. Shawn Howard, a company spokesman, said TransCanada would be "responsible for costs" if something went wrong.
But several Montana farmers and ranchers whose land the pipeline would cross said they didn't support the project but felt powerless to stand in its way. One farmer who declined to give his name said that he tried criticizing the pipeline and was shunned by his community, costing him business.

Coal rail

Southeastern Montana's Tongue River valley, a region of bluffs and badlands, has become a rallying ground for opposition to a railroad that would move another carbon-rich fuel, coal. There, some ranchers and farmers who typically support mining have joined with Native Americans and environmentalists to oppose construction of a 42-mile railway through one of the few river valleys in the state not lined with track.
"I don't call myself an environmentalist, and if it's of benefit to the country, I have no problem with that. But my concern is, is it going to wreck this area?" said Adam Borntreger, 38, who lives in a pastoral Amish community in Ashland on the banks of the Tongue River.
His house, on a dirt road used by horse-drawn carts, is right in the path of the proposed railroad, which would haul coal to be burned to generate electricity, which Borntreger doesn't use.
"The people who live here," said his brother David Borntreger, 46, "have to worry about their home lives' being destroyed."
Alexis Bonogofsky, who works for the National Wildlife Federation and farms not far from the Tongue River, helped organize high-profile protests this fall against the railroad and a proposed mine in nearby Otter Creek.
The industrialization of any wild and scenic place goes against the aesthetic of the West.
Susan Estep
"These things could affect land that has been owned by generations of ranchers, that Native Americans have always called home," Bonogofsky said. "These are local issues."
At a gas station on the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, tribe member Leslie Stump criticized companies that applied to the federal Surface Transportation Board in 2012 for permission to build the railroad.
"It's going to hurt our hunting grounds, maybe affect our water," said Stump, 30, from the back of a horse. "Cheyennes, we fought for this land. Our elders, they don't want to ruin the land."
Environmentalists fear that the railroad could make inevitable the mining of Otter Creek. Kim Link, a spokeswoman for Arch Coal, a St. Louis, Mo., company that hopes to mine the creek, said the project would be in harmony with the land.
"Development of the Otter Creek coal reserves would be done in a responsible manner," she said.
Keystone pipeline
Wade Sikorski.
Nate Schweber
With a view of the Tongue River valley to his west and the nearby path set to be cut by Keystone to the east, Wade Sikorski, from Baker, said the two projects are related.
"I think people are taking a very short view on how these will impact this area," said Sikorski, 57, who wrote a book criticizing the projects and farms land his great-grandfather homesteaded in 1911. "If we stop them, we can save ourselves and maybe the world."
The application to build the railroad remains under review. 


Six hundred miles to the west, in the burly forests of the Bitterroot Mountains, environmentalists, Native Americans, business owners and local residents fought the trucking of huge mining equipment headed north to the tar sands in Canada.
Scores of three-story-tall, 250-foot-long modules called megaloads were to be rolled along a twisting two-lane highway through the Lolo National Forest. Before an Idaho judge ruled in September to stop the shipments, some in Montana howled over the precedent they would set for the land.
"The concern is, once you open up the door, what else are they going to bring up that will violate the earth?" said Brock Conway, 45, a member of the Blackfeet Indian tribe. He protested the megaloads by marching in Montana and traveling to New York City to sing traditional songs in front of the United Nations building.
Susan Estep, a Missoula resident, helped file a lawsuit forcing the megaloads to take a different route.
"The industrialization of any wild and scenic place," she said, "goes against the aesthetic of the West."
The detour threads through other parts of Oregon, Idaho and Montana before ending in Alberta. Protesters gathered last week at the megaloads' starting point in Oregon.  

Sunday, November 17, 2013

A story about hooking up with a special trout : by Chris Ketchem

Another piece of good writing from our friend Chris Ketchem, Hes got the experience and the knowledge to transport us to the water where he is. Enjoy

catching a native brook trout for the first time......Native
He had not caught anything all day. He was discouraged, but not ruined.This stream was notorious for book trout and he was feeling certain. It was late in the day and sun was starting to set on the mountain stream as he was patiently casting his fly rod toward the still pool. He sneaks upstream, watching each step. He is careful not to spook the freshwater native or slip on one of the river rocks covered in slimy, green moss. Late summer in the mountains conveys a hesitance to nice weather in any sense of the word. This particular day began with warm, inviting sunshine. As the day began to expire, an unforgiving breeze would carry his fly line off its handsome course and send his caddis fly splashing down on the water’s brow. The native trout are finicky creatures and do not take kindly to this unnatural presentation of fare. The seasonal elements had no influence on this young angler. The smell ofthe young autumn air inspired another shot at a perfect cast. The next cast presented the fly beautifully and a young brook trout decided he was hungry. The hook was set and the young angler braced himself for the catch. Holding the fragile creature in his hands, he placed the trout back in his home and thanked him for his partnership in this connection between man and the nativebrook trout that originated before the angler. Anglers, such as himself, reflect on these moments that inspire them to bebetter. He will always remember this instance as the onewhere hecaught his first native brook trout deep in the mountains of West Virginia. No longer a young man, he found purpose and meaning in the hobby of fly fishing. Small mountain streams are treacherous and
formidable. When he became one with this experience, it taught him a life lesson that he was grateful was learned in such an attractive and reflective way.

Chris Ketchem 2013

And A couple bad poems from the Editor

The wind on the high prairie
blows all night,
And I only have
Whiskey and Militia Radio
for company
The sage brush preacher
tells me the country is going to hell
and please send money.


Last night I dreamed
a long dead friend
and I saddled up some Grizzlies
and raced to the mountains
She won again
like she always did....


Crossing the Little Big Horn
I imagined the ghosts
of a thousand painted horses
parting before me,
and the wind sounded
like the wailing of squaws
for fallen warriors     


Friday, November 15, 2013

Wars of Religion,
Guns the phallic symbol 
proving might not right
leaders hears voices, 
and spread the word
from Mosque and pulpit ,
is it divine or tumor ?
Should you believe 
a burning bush
or a talking hat ?

Sunday, October 13, 2013

Heres a possible solution to Congressional dead lock

Lets send a box of Live Eels to Our Congressmen

Feague is a term from around the 18th century that means to put a live eel up a horse's bottom. Apparently, this was a horse dealer's trick to make an old horse seem more lively, which I suppose it would. But it does imply that you should never trust an 18th century horse dealer

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

My Talking Hat

 Something in the world is wrong, We are massacring people in the name of god and oil. It scares me because I don't know the solution. Jihadi armies on the horizon , but millions of muslims living in peace. Right wing radio booming from the flathead predicting  the end of times and  cross bearing armies cleansing the forld

Wars of Religion,
Guns the phallic symbol 
proving might not right
leaders hears voices, 
and spread the word
from Mosque and pulpit ,
is it divine or tumor ?
Should you believe 
a burning bush
or a talking hat ?

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Bees are dieing , are Humans next

There is so much on this topic on the internet  and those  of you who  know farmers probably are already aware of this threat., but watch this ted talk

Sunday, September 15, 2013

When the words fell like Rain

When the words fell like Rain

Thinning my Book shelves,
feels like cutting off chunks of flesh.
,The words inside plead to be spared.

Stacks of battered paper backs
hide in the corners muttering incantations
summoning fictitious gods.

History ,Economics , politics ,
science fiction , travelogs and poetry.
Cower beneath my touch.

Meanwhile boxes line up
by the front door like cattle cars
in a 1930's Polish Ghetto .

After leaving them at charity's door
I look at the empty places
left behind and cry.

C.H. 2013

Thursday, September 12, 2013

A new Voice on Radio Free Bozenageles ( Chris Ketchem)

  Very happy to Let my friend Chris Ketchem Post here from his Refuge in a bunker in an undisclosed strip mine somewhere in West Virginia. Hopefully he will help my apathy and spread some enlightenment in these troubled times

Loud Leaves - Chris Ketchem

I’m aging faster than the seasons are changing.
When did the colors change so soon?
Why are leaves falling so quickly?
The air is cooler in the afternoon.
It’s all these outsiders want to see.

It’s already autumn and there is nothing to show.
Will I reap anything from this forest?
Am I blindly going into something untried?
I’ve used this summer without any rest.
All I can remember is that she lied.

I think I can actually hear the leaves hit the ground.
Why do I own this sensitivity? 
Will I ignore any other recognitions?
Seven months to get, but I’m finally free.
The fall then winter will cleanse these sins.

When the fall comes I’ll make new promises.
Will anyone even believe me?
Will that even matter?
Two weeks before I return this key.
Just like this tree so will I tatter.

- Chris Ketchem 2013 

"And by the way, everything in life is writable about if you have the outgoing guts to do it, and the imagination to improvise. The worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt." -Sylvia Plath

Tuesday, July 30, 2013


I'm your top prime cut of meat, I'm your choice,
I wanna be elected,
I'm your yankee doodle dandy in a gold Rolls Royce,
I wanna be elected,
Kids want a saviour, don't need a fake,
I wanna be elected,
We're all gonna rock to the rules that I make,   Alice Cooper

Sunday, July 21, 2013

Small Town New Mexico

 The Goat Family  just back from a trip to small town new Mexico. Its good to get out of Bozeangeles , but very struck by the mix of cultures. Indian ,Mexican , devout Catholics, Cults , Hippies  and survivalists, all sharing a small main street. Went into a  cantina outside of Santa Fe, it could of been a scene out of a john Ford movie , except for the old ladies playing Bingo and the children  surfing their smart phones. Inspired expect more on this. Love the  Mexican take on Death , Dia del Muerto. Actually having supper with the Ancestors

Sunday, July 7, 2013

Hackers , Trolls , Spammers, Prophets and Evolutionists

Hackers , Trolls , Spammers, Prophets and Evolutionists

We all now live in the tower babel . Our social world is spread across the globe. How many of your neighbors do you know by name or even talk to . We are in a media addicted world , is it a tool or weapon f control ?
Today I debated the issue of State religion and education with a Muslim from Lahore Pakistan. we did not agree but we talked. The internet might be a bible but the opportunity to connect is massive.
The key is having a direction , having a goal. We have such an opportunity to learn something from a conversation. These conversations do not have to have an agenda or a result. Talking to a Muslim will not turn you into a Jihad i. Talking to a gay man will not turn you into a Homo, although recently I talked to a lesbian and I might have lesbian tendencies .
Talking to a fox news republican will not turn you into a constipatedEvangelical but maybe it is better not to take the chance.
anyways I do not believe isolation is the world or the internet is the answer , what do you think ?

Saturday, July 6, 2013

What is as Vernepator ?

The Turnspit Dog was a short-legged, long-bodied dog bred to run on a wheel, called a turnspit or dog wheel, to turn meat. The type is now extinct. It is mentioned in Of English Dogs in 1576 under the name "Turnespete".[1] William Bingley'sMemoirs of British Quadrupeds (1809) also talks of a dog employed to help chefs and cooks. It is also known as the Kitchen Dog, the Cooking Dog, the Underdog and the Vernepator. In Linnaeus's 18th century classification of dogs it is listed asCanis vertigus. The breed was lost since it was considered to be such a lowly and common dog that no record was effectively kept of it. They are related, it is believed, to the Glen of Imaal Terrier.
The Vernepator Cur was bred to run on a wheel in order to turn meat so it would cook evenly. This took both courage (to stand near the fire) and loyalty (not to eat the roast). Due to the strenuous nature of the work, a pair of dogs would often be worked in shifts. This may have led to the proverb "every dog has his day". The dogs were also taken to church to serve as foot warmers. One story says that during service at a church in Bath, the Bishop of Gloucester gave a sermon and uttered the line "It was then that Ezekiel saw the wheel...". At the mention of the word "wheel" several turnspit dogs, who had been brought to church as foot warmers, ran for the door.