Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Damn hit A deer , get some Barbecue Sauce







Well considering the amount of roadkill on Montana highways this is a pretty good idea. I went out looking for an Elk yesterday and ran into so fickle Montana weather





Montana would become one of a handful of states that allows humans to consume roadkill meat, provided House Bill 247 is approved by the entire legislature and signed by Gov. Steve Bullock. In an interview with ABC News more than a week after the Montana House approved the legislation, state Rep. Steve Lavin said, "It's like any other meat." However, Lavin warned such meat is only good as a fresh kill. The Montana proposal would allow permits for those who accidentally hit and kill certain animals on roads to harvest meat.

* Lavin's day job is a Montana state trooper where he sees tons of animals dead on highways. Authorities already alert local food banks to potential meals found dead on the road. The legislation, which still must be approved by the Montana Senate, simply makes the practice legal.




http://news.yahoo.com/montana-house-approves-roadkill-human-consumption-181600353.html

Monday, February 18, 2013

vertical forest



 This is something I hope we see in all  be cities in the near future

http://www.earthtechling.com/2013/02/milans-vertical-forest-will-help-clear-the-air/


There are some fanciful architectural designs that look wonderful, almost dreamlike, in drawings, but you know will almost never get built in the real world. One design from Italian architect Stefano Boeri, however, appears to be turning that notion on its head with his Bosco Verticale, or “Vertical Forest,” which is growing like a mighty oak in the smoggy city of Milan, Italy.
An article on the project in Jetson Green described Milan as one of the most polluted cities in Europe, with some of the worst air quality in the European Union. It’s only fitting, then, that Boeri’s design of two residential towers that will be plastered with oxygen-spewing trees and other plants was greenlighted a few years ago, if only to help clear the city’s air.
Artist's rendering of the completed Bosco Verticale. Image via Stafano Boeri Architetti.
Artist’s rendering of the completed Bosco Verticale. Image via Stafano Boeri Architetti.
This structure of these 365-foot and 256-foot towers is nearly complete and should be ready to open later this year. The vertical forest aspect is beginning to take shape as crews are starting to hoist the first of the 900 trees, 5,000 shrubs and 11,000 smaller plants that will be planted in terraces that cover nearly every vertical fa├žade of each tower.

Sunday, February 17, 2013

Redneck Lourdes



 So took Mother Goat and baby Goat  to Bozeman Hot Springs on a long weekend . Don't ever do that. it was like Red Neck Lourdes, more tattoos , too much  skin, people who should not be in speedos or two piece swimsuits. People who would be pushed back into the ocean if they were found on a beach.
  We've had some good times there but this was scary. go early on a week day.






Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Killing Season

The yard bound dogs
howl at their Coyote cousins
only to get yips of laughter in return

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Great Fall Zombie scare




The zombie apocalypse hasn't happened yet, but a few thousand people in Great Falls, Mont., are to be forgiven if they thought it was.
On Monday, the emergency alert system atKRTV-TV in Great Falls was hacked during the "The Steve Wilkos Show" to send out a message that "dead bodies are rising from their graves" in several counties.
The warning also told those watching not to try and apprehend the dangerous individuals, only to get to shelter and stay safe, Gizmodo.au reported.
Just in case you didn't know, there wasn't actually a zombie outbreak.
Nevertheless, KRTV-TV felt obliged to let viewers know both on the air an

Monday, February 11, 2013

Adding Color to your city



  So the 2 or three of you who know  my blog, realize I have a thing for taking back the landscape of cities .I grew up in South louisiana and New Orleans so I know what color  and  green spaces can do to a community.  Here is a great example of how   much change color has brought to a city in Europe. Love Ted

http://www.ted.com/talks/edi_rama_take_back_your_city_with_paint.html

Monday, February 4, 2013

Last Stand of The Wolverine



The elusive, aggressive and little-understood wolverine is positioned to land Endangered Species Act protections.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recommended listing the species as “threatened” under the act Friday. There are still some administrative and legal hurdles before the status is official, said Jason Wilmot, executive director of the Jackson-based Northern Rockies Conservation Cooperative.

“I think it’s an appropriate decision, and I’m glad it’s happening,” Wilmot said. “It’s a proposed rule, and it has to be formalized still, but I think essentially the decision is made. Basically, they’re listed as threatened.”

It is estimated that there are 250 to 300 wolverines in the Lower 48 states, but the number in Wyoming and Jackson Hole is unknown, said Bob Inman, a carnivore biologist with the Wildlife Conservation Society.

“Wyoming is a big question mark,” Inman said over the phone from Mon-tana. “All of our estimates of population size are crude and pretty much guesswork. This is how little research has been done. It’s not even clear if wolverines exist in places as large as the Wind River Range.”

Biologists’ models show that the Wind River, Gros Ventre, Wyoming, Salt, Bighorn and Absaroka ranges all provide suitable habitat for the 17- to 40-pound mustelid, Inman said. But due to extremely low population distribution, occupancy of these ranges is unknown, he said.

“This species has very large home ranges and they’re territorial,” he said.

The species’ existence in the Teton Range “epitomizes” this dynamic, Inman said. Due to a 10-year research project Inman headed, local population dynamics are relatively well understood there. The study, completed in 2010, identified two females and two males making use of the entire Teton Range.

“The population is probably between four and seven individuals, depending on whether there’s young that year,” Inman said.

The Fish and Wildlife Service recommended protections primarily because of the effect of a warming Mountain West. Because of climate change, in some areas, such as central Idaho, suitable habitat could disappear entirely, officials said.

Yet because those losses could take decades to unfold, federal wildlife officials said there’s still time to bolster the population, including by reintroducing them to the high mountains of Colorado.

“This is a species there is still time to do something about,” said Mike Thabault, ecological services director for Fish and Wildlife’s Mountain-Prairie Region.

Friday’s proposal also allows Colorado’s wildlife agency to reintroduce an experimental population of wolverines that could eventually spill into neighboring portions of New Mexico and Wyoming. Colorado has enough high-mountain terrain to support up to 100 more animals.

Any reintroduction into Colorado would require approval from state wildlife commissioners and Legislature, Colorado Parks and Wildlife spokesman Randy Hampton said.

Other areas where wolverines once roamed could also serve as future refuges. Those include portions of Utah, Oregon’s Cascade Range, Wyoming’s Big Horn Mountains and the Sierra Nevada, said Shawn Sartorius, a biologist with Fish and Wildlife based in Montana.

A “threatened” status would shut down wolverine trapping in Montana, the only one of the Lower 48 states where the practice is still allowed. The quota there is five animals annually.

This year’s trapping season was blocked by a state court order, but Montana officials hope to restore trapping next year. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks spokesman Ron Aasheim said the state will review the federal proposal and on Friday had not yet settled on a response.




The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recommended listing the species as “threatened” under the act Friday. There are still some administrative and legal hurdles before the status is official, said Jason Wilmot, executive director of the Jackson-based Northern Rockies Conservation Cooperative.

“I think it’s an appropriate decision, and I’m glad it’s happening,” Wilmot said. “It’s a proposed rule, and it has to be formalized still, but I think essentially the decision is made. Basically, they’re listed as threatened.”

It is estimated that there are 250 to 300 wolverines in the Lower 48 states, but the number in Wyoming and Jackson Hole is unknown, said Bob Inman, a carnivore biologist with the Wildlife Conservation Society.

“Wyoming is a big question mark,” Inman said over the phone from Mon-tana. “All of our estimates of population size are crude and pretty much guesswork. This is how little research has been done. It’s not even clear if wolverines exist in places as large as the Wind River Range.”

Biologists’ models show that the Wind River, Gros Ventre, Wyoming, Salt, Bighorn and Absaroka ranges all provide suitable habitat for the 17- to 40-pound mustelid, Inman said. But due to extremely low population distribution, occupancy of these ranges is unknown, he said.

“This species has very large home ranges and they’re territorial,” he said.

The species’ existence in the Teton Range “epitomizes” this dynamic, Inman said. Due to a 10-year research project Inman headed, local population dynamics are relatively well understood there. The study, completed in 2010, identified two females and two males making use of the entire Teton Range.

“The population is probably between four and seven individuals, depending on whether there’s young that year,” Inman said.

The Fish and Wildlife Service recommended protections primarily because of the effect of a warming Mountain West. Because of climate change, in some areas, such as central Idaho, suitable habitat could disappear entirely, officials said.

Yet because those losses could take decades to unfold, federal wildlife officials said there’s still time to bolster the population, including by reintroducing them to the high mountains of Colorado.

“This is a species there is still time to do something about,” said Mike Thabault, ecological services director for Fish and Wildlife’s Mountain-Prairie Region.

Friday’s proposal also allows Colorado’s wildlife agency to reintroduce an experimental population of wolverines that could eventually spill into neighboring portions of New Mexico and Wyoming. Colorado has enough high-mountain terrain to support up to 100 more animals.

Any reintroduction into Colorado would require approval from state wildlife commissioners and Legislature, Colorado Parks and Wildlife spokesman Randy Hampton said.

Other areas where wolverines once roamed could also serve as future refuges. Those include portions of Utah, Oregon’s Cascade Range, Wyoming’s Big Horn Mountains and the Sierra Nevada, said Shawn Sartorius, a biologist with Fish and Wildlife based in Montana.

A “threatened” status would shut down wolverine trapping in Montana, the only one of the Lower 48 states where the practice is still allowed. The quota there is five animals annually.

This year’s trapping season was blocked by a state court order, but Montana officials hope to restore trapping next year. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks spokesman Ron Aasheim said the state will review the federal proposal and on Friday had not yet settled on a response.

Sunday, February 3, 2013

stupid monkeys


The boardwalk Gypsy
took my quarter
and spit out my fortune.

I lost it in the ocean breeze,
and the organ grinder's monkey
picked it up and laughed .